Nashville Injury Attorneys Blog

Articles Posted in Bicycle accidents

When you are injured in a car wreck or other accident, the last thing you think is “I better go to a doctor that is covered by my insurance.” Unfortunately with insurance companies becoming less pro-patient and more pro-profit keeping this question top of mind is not your first priority if you’re hurt – but it could save you a lot of money.

Recently, the Tennesseean published an article about an injured patient that was advised to attend an Emergency Room for back pain. He did his due diligence and ensured that the ER that he was going to visit was “in network” and covered by his health insurance. However, what he did not realize was that the ER Doctor that attended to his care was “out-of-network”. After all was said and done, there was $1,900.00 owing in medical bills. How did this happen?

Many health insurance provScreen Shot 2016-05-19 at 7.42.48 AMiders make deals with health care facilities and providers to be in the “network” of that insurance company. This means that services provided by those facilities or practitioners will be covered by the insurance. An “in-network” doctor provides these services to a patient and the insurance company pays the insured portion of the bill with the patient receiving a reduced bill.

  1. Don’t Leave the Scene: stay at the scene of the car wreck with your vehicle. Make sure you are in a safe place and out of danger. Turn your hazards on to notify other oncoming vehicles.
  2. Protect Your Health: call and wait for emergency responders, even if you think you are okay. Wait for the ambulance to get medical attention. After a car wreck you may be in shock and not notice the severity of your injuries.
  3. Talk to the Right People:  you should make sure all of your passengers are okay and call the police. The police will come to the scene to do a traffic incident report so you have a record of the accident. You must notify your insurance company about the accident but you are not required to talk to the other driver or the other driver’s insurance company. If you hire us, we can communicate with your insurance company so you don’t have to.

The Tennessean reported today that Nashville is one of the most dangerous metropolitan areas for pedestrians. You can read the article here. It includes the following report:

A report released this week identified the Nashville metro area as one of the most dangerous for pedestrians. The study by Smart Growth America, an advocacy group on pedestrian and urban design issues, looked at the number of pedestrian deaths and how often people are walking in those cities.

The Nashville metro area — with 210 pedestrian deaths between 2003 and 2012 — ranked 15th most dangerous out of the 51 areas studied. Memphis was fifth worst, behind four metro areas in Florida.

The Tennessean reports that a Franklin, Tennessee man was seriously injured when he was struck by a dump truck while riding a bicycle. As an experienced Nashville injury attorney, I have pursued several of these cases. A person on a bicycle is entitled to use a road just like someone in a car and he has to be equally safe. Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-8-172 states that every person riding a bicycle upon a roadway is granted all of the rights and is subject to all of the duties applicable to the driver of a vehicle.

Needless to say, serious injuries usually result from when a moving vehicle strikes a bicycle. But there are several key aspects of this type of case.

The evidence must be preserved. The bicycle is very important and should not be destroyed. A light must be installed on a bike ridden at night.

Every bicycle, when in use at nighttime, shall be equipped with a lamp on the front, which shall emit a white light visible from a distance of at least five hundred feet (500′) to the front, and either a red reflector or a lamp emitting a red light, which shall be visible from a distance of at least five hundred feet (500′) to the rear, when directly in front of lawful upper beams of head lamps on a motor vehicle.

Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-8-177

Also, it is necessary to prove where the bicyclist was at the time of the collision. Tenn. Code Ann. § 55-8-175 requires that the rider, in most circumstances, ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway. That is why it is essential to get witness statements and the officer’s report as soon as possible.

It is important to keep our roads safe for people driving cars, motorcycles and even bicycles. So please slow down and watch out for those around you.
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